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Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 124

  1 <> If [it had] not [been] the LORD who was on our side, now may Israel say;  2 If [it had] not [been] the LORD who was on our side, when men rose up against us:  3 Then they had swallowed us up quick, when their wrath was kindled against us:  4 Then the waters had overwhelmed us, the stream had gone over our soul:  5 Then the proud waters had gone over our soul.  6 Blessed [be] the LORD, who hath not given us [as] a prey to their teeth.  7 Our soul is escaped as a bird out of the snare of the fowlers: the snare is broken, and we are escaped.  8 Our help [is] in the name of the LORD, who made heaven and earth.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline The deliverance of the church. (1-5) Thankfulness for the deliverance. (6-8)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-5 God suffers the enemies of his people sometimes to prevail very far against them, that his power may be seen the more in their deliverance. Happy the people whose God is Jehovah, a God all-sufficient. Besides applying this to any particular deliverance wrought in our days and the ancient times, we should have in our thoughts the great work of redemption by Jesus Christ, by which believers were rescued from Satan.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   6-8 God is the Author of all our deliverances, and he must have the glory. The enemies lay snares for God|s people, to bring them into sin and trouble, and to hold them there. Sometimes they seem to prevail; but in the Lord let us put our trust, and we shall not be put to confusion. The believer will ascribe all the honour of his salvation, to the power, mercy, and truth of God, and look back with wonder and thanksgiving on the way in which the Lord has led him. Let us rejoice that our help for the time to come is in him who made heaven and earth.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 124:1-999 


Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 125

  1 <> They that trust in the LORD [shall be] as mount Zion, [which] cannot be removed, [but] abideth for ever.  2 [As] the mountains [are] round about Jerusalem, so the LORD [is] round about his people from henceforth even for ever.  3 For the rod of the wicked shall not rest upon the lot of the righteous; lest the righteous put forth their hands unto iniquity.  4 Do good, O LORD, unto [those that be] good, and to [them that are] upright in their hearts.  5 As for such as turn aside unto their crooked ways, the LORD shall lead them forth with the workers of iniquity: [but] peace [shall be] upon Israel.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline The security of the righteous. (1-3) Prayer for them, The ruin of the wicked. (4, 5)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-3 All those minds shall be truly stayed, that are stayed on God. They shall be as Mount Zion, firm as it is; a mountain supported by providence, much more as a holy mountain supported by promise. They cannot be removed from confidence in God. They abide for ever in that grace which is the earnest of their everlasting continuance in glory. Committing themselves to God, they shall be safe from their enemies. Even mountains may moulder and come to nothing, and rocks be removed, but God|s covenant with his people cannot be broken, nor his care of them cease. Their troubles shall last no longer than their strength will bear them up under them. The rod of the wicked may come, may fall upon the righteous, upon their persons, their estates, their liberties, their families names, on any thing that falls to their lot; only it cannot reach their souls. And though it may come upon their lot, it shall not rest thereon. The Lord will make all work together for their good. The wicked shall only prove a correcting rod, not a destroying sword; even this rod shall not remain upon them, lest they distrust the promise, thinking God has cast them off.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   4-5 God|s promises should quicken our prayers. The way of holiness is straight; there are no windings or shiftings in it. But the ways of sinners are crooked. They shift from one purpose to another, and turn hither and thither to deceive; but disappointment and misery shall befal them. Those who cleave to the ways of God, though they may have trouble in their way, their end shall be peace. The pleading of their Saviour for them, secures to them the upholding power and preserving grace of their God. Lord, number us with them, in time, and to eternity.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 125:0-999 


Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 126

  1 <> When the LORD turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream.  2 Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with singing: then said they among the heathen, The LORD hath done great things for them.  3 The LORD hath done great things for us; [whereof] we are glad.  4 Turn again our captivity, O LORD, as the streams in the south.  5 They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.  6 He that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing precious seed, shall doubtless come again with rejoicing, bringing his sheaves [with him].

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline Those returned out of captivity are to be thankful. (1-3) Those yet in captivity are encouraged. (4-6)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-3 It is good to observe how God|s deliverances of the church are for us, that we may rejoice in them. And how ought redemption from the wrath to come, from the power of sin and of Satan, to be valued! The sinner convinced of his guilt and danger, when by looking to a crucified Saviour he receives peace to his conscience, and power to break off his sins, often can scarcely believe that the prospect which opens to him is a reality.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   4-6 The beginnings of mercies encourage us to pray for the completion of them. And while we are in this world there will be matter for prayer, even when we are most furnished with matter for praise. Suffering saints are often in tears; they share the calamities of human life, and commonly have a greater share than others. But they sow in tears; they do the duty of an afflicted state. Weeping must not hinder sowing; we must get good from times of affliction. And they that sow, in the tears of godly sorrow, to the Spirit, shall of the Spirit reap life everlasting; and that will be a joyful harvest indeed. Blessed are those that mourn, for they shall be for ever comforted. When we mourn for our sins, or suffer for Christ|s sake, we are sowing in tears, to reap in joy. And remember that God is not mocked; for whatever a man soweth that shall he reap, Ga 6:7-9. Here, O disciple of Jesus, behold an emblem of thy present labour and future reward; the day is coming when thou shalt reap in joy, plentiful shall be thy harvest, and great shall be thy joy in the Lord.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 126:1-999 


Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 127

  1 <> Except the LORD build the house, they labour in vain that build it: except the LORD keep the city, the watchman waketh [but] in vain.  2 [It is] vain for you to rise up early, to sit up late, to eat the bread of sorrows: [for] so he giveth his beloved sleep.  3 Lo, children [are] an heritage of the LORD: [and] the fruit of the womb [is his] reward.  4 As arrows [are] in the hand of a mighty man; so [are] children of the youth.  5 Happy [is] the man that hath his quiver full of them: they shall not be ashamed, but they shall speak with the enemies in the gate.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   4-6 The value of the Divine blessing. --Let us always look to God|s providence. In all the affairs and business of a family we must depend upon his blessing. 1. For raising a family. If God be not acknowledged, we have no reason to expect his blessing; and the best-laid plans fail, unless he crowns them with success. 2. For the safety of a family or a city. Except the Lord keep the city, the watchmen, though they neither slumber nor sleep, wake but in vain; mischief may break out, which even early discoveries may not be able to prevent. 3. For enriching a family. Some are so eager upon the world, that they are continually full of care, which makes their comforts bitter, and their lives a burden. All this is to get money; but all in vain, except God prosper them: while those who love the Lord, using due diligence in their lawful callings, and casting all their care upon him, have needful success, without uneasiness or vexation. Our care must be to keep ourselves in the love of God; then we may be easy, whether we have little or much of this world. But we must use the proper means very diligently. Children are God|s gifts, a heritage, and a reward; and are to be accounted blessings, and not burdens: he who sends mouths, will send meat, if we trust in him. They are a great support and defence to a family. Children who are young, may be directed aright to the mark, God|s glory, and the service of their generation; but when they are gone into the world, they are arrows out of the hand, it is too late to direct them then. But these arrows in the hand too often prove arrows in the heart, a grief to godly parents. Yet, if trained according to God|s word, they generally prove the best defence in declining years, remembering their obligations to their parents, and taking care of them in old age. All earthly comforts are uncertain, but the Lord will assuredly comfort and bless those who serve him; and those who seek the conversion of sinners, will find that their spiritual children are their joy and crown in the day of Jesus Christ.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 127:0-999 


Evening Bible Reading - 1 Corinthians 7

  1 Now concerning the things whereof ye wrote unto me: [It is] good for a man not to touch a woman.  2 Nevertheless, [to avoid] fornication, let every man have his own wife, and let every woman have her own husband.  3 Let the husband render unto the wife due benevolence: and likewise also the wife unto the husband.  4 The wife hath not power of her own body, but the husband: and likewise also the husband hath not power of his own body, but the wife.  5 Defraud ye not one the other, except [it be] with consent for a time, that ye may give yourselves to fasting and prayer; and come together again, that Satan tempt you not for your incontinency.  6 But I speak this by permission, [and] not of commandment.  7 For I would that all men were even as I myself. But every man hath his proper gift of God, one after this manner, and another after that.  8 I say therefore to the unmarried and widows, It is good for them if they abide even as I.  9 But if they cannot contain, let them marry: for it is better to marry than to burn.  10 And unto the married I command, [yet] not I, but the Lord, Let not the wife depart from [her] husband:  11 But and if she depart, let her remain unmarried, or be reconciled to [her] husband: and let not the husband put away [his] wife.  12 But to the rest speak I, not the Lord: If any brother hath a wife that believeth not, and she be pleased to dwell with him, let him not put her away.  13 And the woman which hath an husband that believeth not, and if he be pleased to dwell with her, let her not leave him.  14 For the unbelieving husband is sanctified by the wife, and the unbelieving wife is sanctified by the husband: else were your children unclean; but now are they holy.  15 But if the unbelieving depart, let him depart. A brother or a sister is not under bondage in such [cases]: but God hath called us to peace.  16 For what knowest thou, O wife, whether thou shalt save [thy] husband? or how knowest thou, O man, whether thou shalt save [thy] wife?  17 But as God hath distributed to every man, as the Lord hath called every one, so let him walk. And so ordain I in all churches.  18 Is any man called being circumcised? let him not become uncircumcised. Is any called in uncircumcision? let him not be circumcised.  19 Circumcision is nothing, and uncircumcision is nothing, but the keeping of the commandments of God.  20 Let every man abide in the same calling wherein he was called.  21 Art thou called [being] a servant? care not for it: but if thou mayest be made free, use [it] rather.  22 For he that is called in the Lord, [being] a servant, is the Lordís freeman: likewise also he that is called, [being] free, is Christís servant.  23 Ye are bought with a price; be not ye the servants of men.  24 Brethren, let every man, wherein he is called, therein abide with God.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-9 The apostle tells the Corinthians that it was good, in that juncture of time, for Christians to keep themselves single. Yet he says that marriage, and the comforts of that state, are settled by Divine wisdom. Though none may break the law of God, yet that perfect rule leaves men at liberty to serve him in the way most suited to their powers and circumstances, of which others often are very unfit judges. All must determine for themselves, seeking counsel from God how they ought to act.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   10-16 Man and wife must not separate for any other cause than what Christ allows. Divorce, at that time, was very common among both Jews and Gentiles, on very slight pretexts. Marriage is a Divine institution; and is an engagement for life, by God|s appointment. We are bound, as much as in us lies, to live peaceably with all men, Ro 12:18, therefore to promote the peace and comfort of our nearest relatives, though unbelievers. It should be the labour and study of those who are married, to make each other as easy and happy as possible. Should a Christian desert a husband or wife, when there is opportunity to give the greatest proof of love? Stay, and labour heartily for the conversion of thy relative. In every state and relation the Lord has called us to peace; and every thing should be done to promote harmony, as far as truth and holiness will permit.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   17-24 The rules of Christianity reach every condition; and in every state a man may live so as to be a credit to it. It is the duty of every Christian to be content with his lot, and to conduct himself in his rank and place as becomes a Christian. Our comfort and happiness depend on what we are to Christ, not what we are in the world. No man should think to make his faith or religion, an argument to break through any natural or civil obligations. He should quietly and contentedly abide in the condition in which he is placed by Divine Providence.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For 1 Corinthians 7:1-24 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For 1 Corinthians 7:1-24 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For 1 Corinthians 7:3-24 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For 1 Corinthians 7:10-24 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For 1 Corinthians 7:18-24