Harmony Baptist Church

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Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 99

  1 The LORD reigneth; let the people tremble: he sitteth [between] the cherubims; let the earth be moved.  2 The LORD [is] great in Zion; and he [is] high above all the people.  3 Let them praise thy great and terrible name; [for] it [is] holy.  4 The kingís strength also loveth judgment; thou dost establish equity, thou executest judgment and righteousness in Jacob.  5 Exalt ye the LORD our God, and worship at his footstool; [for] he [is] holy.  6 Moses and Aaron among his priests, and Samuel among them that call upon his name; they called upon the LORD, and he answered them.  7 He spake unto them in the cloudy pillar: they kept his testimonies, and the ordinance [that] he gave them.  8 Thou answeredst them, O LORD our God: thou wast a God that forgavest them, though thou tookest vengeance of their inventions.  9 Exalt the LORD our God, and worship at his holy hill; for the LORD our God [is] holy.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline The happy government God|s people are under. (1-5) Its happy administration. (6-9)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-5 God governs the world by his providence, governs the church by his grace, and both by his Son. The inhabitants of the earth have cause to tremble, but the Redeemer still waits to be gracious. Let all who hear, take warning, and seek his mercy. The more we humble ourselves before God, the more we exalt him; and let us be thus reverent, for he is holy.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   6-9 The happiness of Israel is made out by referring to the most useful governors of that people. They in every thing made God|s word and law their rule, knowing that they could not else expect that their prayers should be answered. They all wonderfully prevailed with God in prayer; miracles were wrought at their request. They pleaded for the people, and obtained answers of peace. Our Prophet and High Priest, of infinitely greater dignity than Moses, Aaron, or Samuel, has received and declared to us the will of the Father. Let us not only exalt the Lord with our lips, but give him the throne in our heart; and while we worship him upon his mercy-seat, let us never forget that he is holy.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 99:1-999 


Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 100

  1 <> Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all ye lands.  2 Serve the LORD with gladness: come before his presence with singing.  3 Know ye that the LORD he [is] God: [it is] he [that] hath made us, and not we ourselves; [we are] his people, and the sheep of his pasture.  4 Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, [and] into his courts with praise: be thankful unto him, [and] bless his name.  5 For the LORD [is] good; his mercy [is] everlasting; and his truth [endureth] to all generations.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   6-9 An exhortation to praise God, and rejoice in him. --This song of praise should be considered as a prophecy, and even used as a prayer, for the coming of that time when all people shall know that the Lord he is God, and shall become his worshippers, and the sheep of his pasture. Great encouragement is given us, in worshipping God, to do it cheerfully. If, when we strayed like wandering sheep, he has brought us again to his fold, we have indeed abundant cause to bless his name. The matter of praise, and the motives to it, are very important. Know ye what God is in himself, and what he is to you. Know it; consider and apply it, then you will be more close and constant, more inward and serious, in his worship. The covenant of grace set down in the Scriptures of the Old and New Testament, with so many rich promises, to strengthen the faith of every weak believer, makes the matter of God|s praise and of his people|s joys so sure, that how sad soever our spirits may be when we look to ourselves, yet we shall have reason to praise the Lord when we look to his goodness and mercy, and to what he has said in his word for our comfort.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 100:0-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 100:1-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 100:3-999 


Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 101

  1 <> I will sing of mercy and judgment: unto thee, O LORD, will I sing.  2 I will behave myself wisely in a perfect way. O when wilt thou come unto me? I will walk within my house with a perfect heart.  3 I will set no wicked thing before mine eyes: I hate the work of them that turn aside; [it] shall not cleave to me.  4 A froward heart shall depart from me: I will not know a wicked [person].  5 Whoso privily slandereth his neighbour, him will I cut off: him that hath an high look and a proud heart will not I suffer.  6 Mine eyes [shall be] upon the faithful of the land, that they may dwell with me: he that walketh in a perfect way, he shall serve me.  7 He that worketh deceit shall not dwell within my house: he that telleth lies shall not tarry in my sight.  8 I will early destroy all the wicked of the land; that I may cut off all wicked doers from the city of the LORD.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   6-9 David|s vow and profession of godliness. --In this psalm we have David declaring how he intended to regulate his household, and to govern his kingdom, that he might stop wickedness, and encourage godliness. It is also applicable to private families, and is the householder|s psalm. It teaches all that have any power, whether more or less, to use it so as to be a terror to evil-doers, and a praise to them that do well. The chosen subject of the psalm is God|s mercy and judgment. The Lord|s providences concerning his people are commonly mixed; mercy and judgment. God has set the one over against the other, both to do good, like showers and sunshine. When, in his providence, he exercises us with the mixture of mercy and judgment, we must make suitable acknowledgments to him for both. Family mercies and family afflictions are both calls to family religion. Those who are in public stations are not thereby excused from care in governing their families; they are the more concerned to set a good example of ruling their own houses well. Whenever a man has a house of his own, let him seek to have God to dwell with him; and those may expect his presence, who walk with a perfect heart, in a perfect way. David resolves to practise no evil himself. He further resolves not to keep bad servants, nor to employ those about him that are wicked. He will not admit them into his family, lest they spread the infection of sin. A froward heart, one that delights to be cross and perverse, is not fit for society, the bond of which is Christian love. Nor will he countenance slanderers, those who take pleasure in wounding their neighbour|s reputation. Also, God resists the proud, and false, deceitful people, who scruple not to tell lies, or commit frauds. Let every one be zealous and diligent to reform his own heart and ways, and to do this early; ever mindful of that future, most awful morning, when the King of righteousness shall cut off all wicked doers from the heavenly Jerusalem.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 101:1-999 


Morning Bible Reading - Psalms 102

  1 <> Hear my prayer, O LORD, and let my cry come unto thee.  2 Hide not thy face from me in the day [when] I am in trouble; incline thine ear unto me: in the day [when] I call answer me speedily.  3 For my days are consumed like smoke, and my bones are burned as an hearth.  4 My heart is smitten, and withered like grass; so that I forget to eat my bread.  5 By reason of the voice of my groaning my bones cleave to my skin.  6 I am like a pelican of the wilderness: I am like an owl of the desert.  7 I watch, and am as a sparrow alone upon the house top.  8 Mine enemies reproach me all the day; [and] they that are mad against me are sworn against me.  9 For I have eaten ashes like bread, and mingled my drink with weeping,  10 Because of thine indignation and thy wrath: for thou hast lifted me up, and cast me down.  11 My days [are] like a shadow that declineth; and I am withered like grass.  12 But thou, O LORD, shalt endure for ever; and thy remembrance unto all generations.  13 Thou shalt arise, [and] have mercy upon Zion: for the time to favour her, yea, the set time, is come.  14 For thy servants take pleasure in her stones, and favour the dust thereof.  15 So the heathen shall fear the name of the LORD, and all the kings of the earth thy glory.  16 When the LORD shall build up Zion, he shall appear in his glory.  17 He will regard the prayer of the destitute, and not despise their prayer.  18 This shall be written for the generation to come: and the people which shall be created shall praise the LORD.  19 For he hath looked down from the height of his sanctuary; from heaven did the LORD behold the earth;  20 To hear the groaning of the prisoner; to loose those that are appointed to death;  21 To declare the name of the LORD in Zion, and his praise in Jerusalem;  22 When the people are gathered together, and the kingdoms, to serve the LORD.  23 He weakened my strength in the way; he shortened my days.  24 I said, O my God, take me not away in the midst of my days: thy years [are] throughout all generations.  25 Of old hast thou laid the foundation of the earth: and the heavens [are] the work of thy hands.  26 They shall perish, but thou shalt endure: yea, all of them shall wax old like a garment; as a vesture shalt thou change them, and they shall be changed:  27 But thou [art] the same, and thy years shall have no end.  28 The children of thy servants shall continue, and their seed shall be established before thee.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline A sorrowful complaint of great afflictions. (1-11) Encouragement by expecting the performances of God|s promises to his church. (12-22) The unchangeableness of God. (23-28)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-11 The whole word of God is of use to direct us in prayer; but here, is often elsewhere, the Holy Ghost has put words into our mouths. Here is a prayer put into the hands of the afflicted; let them present it to God. Even good men may be almost overwhelmed with afflictions. It is our duty and interest to pray; and it is comfort to an afflicted spirit to unburden itself, by a humble representation of its griefs. We must say, Blessed be the name of the Lord, who both gives and takes away. The psalmist looked upon himself as a dying man; My days are like a shadow.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   12-22 We are dying creatures, but God is an everlasting God, the protector of his church; we may be confident that it will not be neglected. When we consider our own vileness, our darkness and deadness, and the manifold defects in our prayers, we have cause to fear that they will not be received in heaven; but we are here assured of the contrary, for we have an Advocate with the Father, and are under grace, not under the law. Redemption is the subject of praise in the Christian church; and that great work is described by the temporal deliverance and restoration of Israel. Look down upon us, Lord Jesus; and bring us into the glorious liberty of thy children, that we may bless and praise thy name.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   23-28 Bodily distempers soon weaken our strength, then what can we expect but that our months should be cut off in the midst; and what should we do but provide accordingly? We must own God|s hand in it; and must reconcile this to his love, for often those that have used their strength well, have it weakened; and those who, as we think, can very ill be spared, have their days shortened. It is very comfortable, in reference to all the changes and dangers of the church, to remember that Jesus Christ is the same yesterday, to-day, and for ever. And in reference to the death of our bodies, and the removal of friends, to remember that God is an everlasting God. Do not let us overlook the assurance this psalm contains of a happy end to all the believer|s trials. Though all things are changing, dying, perishing, like a vesture folding up and hastening to decay, yet Jesus lives, and thus all is secure, for he hath said, Because I live ye shall live also.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Psalms 102:1-999 


Evening Bible Reading - Romans 13

  1 Let every soul be subject unto the higher powers. For there is no power but of God: the powers that be are ordained of God.  2 Whosoever therefore resisteth the power, resisteth the ordinance of God: and they that resist shall receive to themselves damnation.  3 For rulers are not a terror to good works, but to the evil. Wilt thou then not be afraid of the power? do that which is good, and thou shalt have praise of the same:  4 For he is the minister of God to thee for good. But if thou do that which is evil, be afraid; for he beareth not the sword in vain: for he is the minister of God, a revenger to [execute] wrath upon him that doeth evil.  5 Wherefore [ye] must needs be subject, not only for wrath, but also for conscience sake.  6 For for this cause pay ye tribute also: for they are Godís ministers, attending continually upon this very thing.  7 Render therefore to all their dues: tribute to whom tribute [is due]; custom to whom custom; fear to whom fear; honour to whom honour.  8 Owe no man any thing, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law.  9 For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if [there be] any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.  10 Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: therefore love [is] the fulfilling of the law.  11 And that, knowing the time, that now [it is] high time to awake out of sleep: for now [is] our salvation nearer than when we believed.  12 The night is far spent, the day is at hand: let us therefore cast off the works of darkness, and let us put on the armour of light.  13 Let us walk honestly, as in the day; not in rioting and drunkenness, not in chambering and wantonness, not in strife and envying.  14 But put ye on the Lord Jesus Christ, and make not provision for the flesh, to [fulfil] the lusts [thereof].

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline The duty of subjection to governors. (1-7) Exhortations to mutual love. (8-10) To temperance and sobriety. (11-14)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-7 The grace of the gospel teaches us submission and quiet, where pride and the carnal mind only see causes for murmuring and discontent. Whatever the persons in authority over us themselves may be, yet the just power they have, must be submitted to and obeyed. In the general course of human affairs, rulers are not a terror to honest, quiet, and good subjects, but to evil-doers. Such is the power of sin and corruption, that many will be kept back from crimes only by the fear of punishment. Thou hast the benefit of the government, therefore do what thou canst to preserve it, and nothing to disturb it. This directs private persons to behave quietly and peaceably where God has set them, 1Ti 2:1, 2. Christians must not use any trick or fraud. All smuggling, dealing in contraband goods, withholding or evading duties, is rebellion against the express command of God. Thus honest neighbours are robbed, who will have to pay the more; and the crimes of smugglers, and others who join with them, are abetted. It is painful that some professors of the gospel should countenance such dishonest practices. The lesson here taught it becomes all Christians to learn and practise, that the godly in the land will always be found the quiet and the peaceable in the land, whatever others are.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   8-10 Christians must avoid useless expense, and be careful not to contract any debts they have not the power to discharge. They are also to stand aloof from all venturesome speculations and rash engagements, and whatever may expose them to the danger of not rendering to all their due. Do not keep in any one|s debt. Give every one his own. Do not spend that on yourselves, which you owe to others. But many who are very sensible of the trouble, think little of the sin, of being in debt. Love to others includes all the duties of the second table. The last five of the ten commandments are all summed up in this royal law, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself; with the same sincerity that thou lovest thyself, though not in the same measure and degree. He that loves his neighbour as himself, will desire the welfare of his neighbour. On this is built that golden rule, of doing as we would be done by. Love is a living, active principle of obedience to the whole law. Let us not only avoid injuries to the persons, connexions, property, and characters of men; but do no kind or degree of evil to any man, and study to be useful in every station of life.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   11-14 Four things are here taught, as a Christian|s directory for his day|s work. When to awake; Now; and to awake out of the sleep of carnal security, sloth, and negligence; out of the sleep of spiritual death, and out of the sleep of spiritual deadness. Considering the time; a busy time; a perilous time. Also the salvation nigh at hand. Let us mind our way, and mend our pace, we are nearer our journey|s end. Also to make ourselves ready. The night is far spent, the day is at hand; therefore it is time to dress ourselves. Observe what we must put off; clothes worn in the night. Cast off the sinful works of darkness. Observe what we must put on; how we should dress our souls. Put on the armour of light. A Christian must reckon himself undressed, if unarmed. The graces of the Spirit are this armour, to secure the soul from Satan|s temptations, and the assaults of this present evil world. Put on Christ; that includes all. Put on righteousness of Christ, for justification. Put on the Spirit and grace of Christ, for sanctification. The Lord Jesus Christ must be put on as Lord to rule you as Jesus to save you; and in both, as Christ anointed and appointed by the Father to this ruling, saving work. And how to walk. When we are up and ready, we are not to sit still, but to appear abroad; let us walk. Christianity teaches us how to walk so as to please God, who ever sees us. Walk honestly as in the day; avoiding the works of darkness. Where there are riot and drunkenness, there usually are chambering and wantonness, and strife and envy. Solomon puts these all together, Pr 23:29-35. See what provision to make. Our great care must be to provide for our souls: but must we take no care about our bodies? Yes; but two things are forbidden. Perplexing ourselves with anxious, encumbering care; and indulging ourselves in irregular desires. Natural wants are to be answered, but evil appetites must be checked and denied. To ask meat for our necessities, is our duty, we are taught to pray for daily bread; but to ask meat for our lusts, is provoking God, Ps 78:18.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Romans 13:1-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Romans 13:2-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Romans 13:3-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Romans 13:8-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Romans 13:10-999