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Morning Bible Reading - Genesis 33

  1 And Jacob lifted up his eyes, and looked, and, behold, Esau came, and with him four hundred men. And he divided the children unto Leah, and unto Rachel, and unto the two handmaids.  2 And he put the handmaids and their children foremost, and Leah and her children after, and Rachel and Joseph hindermost.  3 And he passed over before them, and bowed himself to the ground seven times, until he came near to his brother.  4 And Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck, and kissed him: and they wept.  5 And he lifted up his eyes, and saw the women and the children; and said, Who [are] those with thee? And he said, The children which God hath graciously given thy servant.  6 Then the handmaidens came near, they and their children, and they bowed themselves.  7 And Leah also with her children came near, and bowed themselves: and after came Joseph near and Rachel, and they bowed themselves.  8 And he said, What [meanest] thou by all this drove which I met? And he said, [These are] to find grace in the sight of my lord.  9 And Esau said, I have enough, my brother; keep that thou hast unto thyself.  10 And Jacob said, Nay, I pray thee, if now I have found grace in thy sight, then receive my present at my hand: for therefore I have seen thy face, as though I had seen the face of God, and thou wast pleased with me.  11 Take, I pray thee, my blessing that is brought to thee; because God hath dealt graciously with me, and because I have enough. And he urged him, and he took [it].  12 And he said, Let us take our journey, and let us go, and I will go before thee.  13 And he said unto him, My lord knoweth that the children [are] tender, and the flocks and herds with young [are] with me: and if men should overdrive them one day, all the flock will die.  14 Let my lord, I pray thee, pass over before his servant: and I will lead on softly, according as the cattle that goeth before me and the children be able to endure, until I come unto my lord unto Seir.  15 And Esau said, Let me now leave with thee [some] of the folk that [are] with me. And he said, What needeth it? let me find grace in the sight of my lord.  16 So Esau returned that day on his way unto Seir.  17 And Jacob journeyed to Succoth, and built him an house, and made booths for his cattle: therefore the name of the place is called Succoth.  18 And Jacob came to Shalem, a city of Shechem, which [is] in the land of Canaan, when he came from Padanaram; and pitched his tent before the city.  19 And he bought a parcel of a field, where he had spread his tent, at the hand of the children of Hamor, Shechemís father, for an hundred pieces of money.  20 And he erected there an altar, and called it EleloheIsrael.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline The friendly meeting of Jacob and Esau. (1-16) Jacob comes to Succoth and Shalem, He builds an altar. (17-20)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-16 Jacob, having by prayer committed his case to God, went on his way. Come what will, nothing can come amiss to him whose heart is fixed, trusting in God. Jacob bowed to Esau. A humble, submissive behaviour goes far towards turning away wrath. Esau embraced Jacob. God has the hearts of all men in his hands, and can turn them when and how he pleases. It is not in vain to trust in God, and to call upon him in the day of trouble. And when a man|s ways please the Lord he maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him. Esau receives Jacob as a brother, and much tenderness passes between them. Esau asks, Who are those with thee? To this common question, Jacob spoke like himself, like a man whose eyes are ever directed towards the Lord. Jacob urged Esau, though his fear was over, and he took his present. It is well when men|s religion makes them generous, free-hearted, and open-handed. But Jacob declined Esau|s offer to accompany him. It is not desirable to be too intimate with superior ungodly relations, who will expect us to join in their vanities, or at least to wink at them, though they blame, and perhaps mock at, our religion. Such will either be a snare to us, or offended with us. We shall venture the loss of all things, rather than endanger our souls, if we know their value; rather than renounce Christ, if we truly love him. And let Jacob|s care and tender attention to his family and flocks remind us of the good Shepherd of our souls, who gathers the lambs with his arm, and carries them in his bosom, and gently leads those that are with young, Isa 40:11. As parents, teachers or pastors, we should all follow his example.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   17-20 Jacob did not content himself with words of thanks for God|s favour to him, but gave real thanks. Also he kept up religion, and the worship of God in his family. Where we have a tent, God must have an altar. Jacob dedicated this altar to the honour of El-elohe-Israel, God, the God of Israel; to the honour of God, the only living and true God; and to the honour of the God of Israel, as a God in covenant with him. Israel|s God is Israel|s glory. Blessed be his name, he is still the mighty God, the God of Israel. May we praise his name, and rejoice in his love, through our pilgrimage here on earth, and for ever in the heavenly Canaan.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 33:1-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 33:13-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 33:18-999 

Morning Bible Reading - Genesis 34

  1 And Dinah the daughter of Leah, which she bare unto Jacob, went out to see the daughters of the land.  2 And when Shechem the son of Hamor the Hivite, prince of the country, saw her, he took her, and lay with her, and defiled her.  3 And his soul clave unto Dinah the daughter of Jacob, and he loved the damsel, and spake kindly unto the damsel.  4 And Shechem spake unto his father Hamor, saying, Get me this damsel to wife.  5 And Jacob heard that he had defiled Dinah his daughter: now his sons were with his cattle in the field: and Jacob held his peace until they were come.  6 And Hamor the father of Shechem went out unto Jacob to commune with him.  7 And the sons of Jacob came out of the field when they heard [it]: and the men were grieved, and they were very wroth, because he had wrought folly in Israel in lying with Jacobís daughter; which thing ought not to be done.  8 And Hamor communed with them, saying, The soul of my son Shechem longeth for your daughter: I pray you give her him to wife.  9 And make ye marriages with us, [and] give your daughters unto us, and take our daughters unto you.  10 And ye shall dwell with us: and the land shall be before you; dwell and trade ye therein, and get you possessions therein.  11 And Shechem said unto her father and unto her brethren, Let me find grace in your eyes, and what ye shall say unto me I will give.  12 Ask me never so much dowry and gift, and I will give according as ye shall say unto me: but give me the damsel to wife.  13 And the sons of Jacob answered Shechem and Hamor his father deceitfully, and said, because he had defiled Dinah their sister:  14 And they said unto them, We cannot do this thing, to give our sister to one that is uncircumcised; for that [were] a reproach unto us:  15 But in this will we consent unto you: If ye will be as we [be], that every male of you be circumcised;  16 Then will we give our daughters unto you, and we will take your daughters to us, and we will dwell with you, and we will become one people.  17 But if ye will not hearken unto us, to be circumcised; then will we take our daughter, and we will be gone.  18 And their words pleased Hamor, and Shechem Hamorís son.  19 And the young man deferred not to do the thing, because he had delight in Jacobís daughter: and he [was] more honourable than all the house of his father.  20 And Hamor and Shechem his son came unto the gate of their city, and communed with the men of their city, saying,  21 These men [are] peaceable with us; therefore let them dwell in the land, and trade therein; for the land, behold, [it is] large enough for them; let us take their daughters to us for wives, and let us give them our daughters.  22 Only herein will the men consent unto us for to dwell with us, to be one people, if every male among us be circumcised, as they [are] circumcised.  23 [Shall] not their cattle and their substance and every beast of theirs [be] ours? only let us consent unto them, and they will dwell with us.  24 And unto Hamor and unto Shechem his son hearkened all that went out of the gate of his city; and every male was circumcised, all that went out of the gate of his city.  25 And it came to pass on the third day, when they were sore, that two of the sons of Jacob, Simeon and Levi, Dinahís brethren, took each man his sword, and came upon the city boldly, and slew all the males.  26 And they slew Hamor and Shechem his son with the edge of the sword, and took Dinah out of Shechemís house, and went out.  27 The sons of Jacob came upon the slain, and spoiled the city, because they had defiled their sister.  28 They took their sheep, and their oxen, and their asses, and that which [was] in the city, and that which [was] in the field,  29 And all their wealth, and all their little ones, and their wives took they captive, and spoiled even all that [was] in the house.  30 And Jacob said to Simeon and Levi, Ye have troubled me to make me to stink among the inhabitants of the land, among the Canaanites and the Perizzites: and I [being] few in number, they shall gather themselves together against me, and slay me; and I shall be destroyed, I and my house.  31 And they said, Should he deal with our sister as with an harlot?

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline Dinah defiled by Shechem. (1-19) The Shechemites murdered by Simeon and Levi. (20-31)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-19 Young persons, especially females, are never so safe and well off as under the care of pious parents. Their own ignorance, and the flattery and artifices of designing, wicked people, who are ever laying snares for them, expose them to great danger. They are their own enemies if they desire to go abroad, especially alone, among strangers to true religion. Those parents are very wrong who do not hinder their children from needlessly exposing themselves to danger. Indulged children, like Dinah, often become a grief and shame to their families. Her pretence was, to see the daughters of the land, to see how they dressed, and how they danced, and what was fashionable among them; she went to see, yet that was not all, she went to be seen too. She went to get acquaintance with the Canaanites, and to learn their ways. See what came of Dinah|s gadding. The beginning of sin is as the letting forth of water. How great a matter does a little fire kindle! We should carefully avoid all occasions of sin and approaches to it.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   20-31 The Shechemites submitted to the sacred rite, only to serve a turn, to please their prince, and to enrich themselves, and it was just with God to bring punishment upon them. As nothing secures us better than true religion, so nothing exposes us more than religion only pretended to. But Simeon and Levi were most unrighteous. Those who act wickedly, under the pretext of religion, are the worst enemies of the truth, and harden the hearts of many to destruction. The crimes of others form no excuse for us. Alas! how one sin leads on to another, and, like flames of fire, spread desolation in every direction! Foolish pleasures lead to seduction; seduction produces wrath; wrath thirsts for revenge; the thirst of revenge has recourse to treachery; treachery issues in murder; and murder is followed by other lawless actions. Were we to trace the history of unlawful commerce between the sexes, we should find it, more than any other sin, ending in blood.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 34:1-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 34:10-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 34:18-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 34:31-999 

Morning Bible Reading - Genesis 35

  1 And God said unto Jacob, Arise, go up to Bethel, and dwell there: and make there an altar unto God, that appeared unto thee when thou fleddest from the face of Esau thy brother.  2 Then Jacob said unto his household, and to all that [were] with him, Put away the strange gods that [are] among you, and be clean, and change your garments:  3 And let us arise, and go up to Bethel; and I will make there an altar unto God, who answered me in the day of my distress, and was with me in the way which I went.  4 And they gave unto Jacob all the strange gods which [were] in their hand, and [all their] earrings which [were] in their ears; and Jacob hid them under the oak which [was] by Shechem.  5 And they journeyed: and the terror of God was upon the cities that [were] round about them, and they did not pursue after the sons of Jacob.  6 So Jacob came to Luz, which [is] in the land of Canaan, that [is], Bethel, he and all the people that [were] with him.  7 And he built there an altar, and called the place Elbethel: because there God appeared unto him, when he fled from the face of his brother.  8 But Deborah Rebekahís nurse died, and she was buried beneath Bethel under an oak: and the name of it was called Allonbachuth.  9 And God appeared unto Jacob again, when he came out of Padanaram, and blessed him.  10 And God said unto him, Thy name [is] Jacob: thy name shall not be called any more Jacob, but Israel shall be thy name: and he called his name Israel.  11 And God said unto him, I [am] God Almighty: be fruitful and multiply; a nation and a company of nations shall be of thee, and kings shall come out of thy loins;  12 And the land which I gave Abraham and Isaac, to thee I will give it, and to thy seed after thee will I give the land.  13 And God went up from him in the place where he talked with him.  14 And Jacob set up a pillar in the place where he talked with him, [even] a pillar of stone: and he poured a drink offering thereon, and he poured oil thereon.  15 And Jacob called the name of the place where God spake with him, Bethel.  16 And they journeyed from Bethel; and there was but a little way to come to Ephrath: and Rachel travailed, and she had hard labour.  17 And it came to pass, when she was in hard labour, that the midwife said unto her, Fear not; thou shalt have this son also.  18 And it came to pass, as her soul was in departing, (for she died) that she called his name Benoni: but his father called him Benjamin.  19 And Rachel died, and was buried in the way to Ephrath, which [is] Bethlehem.  20 And Jacob set a pillar upon her grave: that [is] the pillar of Rachelís grave unto this day.  21 And Israel journeyed, and spread his tent beyond the tower of Edar.  22 And it came to pass, when Israel dwelt in that land, that Reuben went and lay with Bilhah his fatherís concubine: and Israel heard [it]. Now the sons of Jacob were twelve:  23 The sons of Leah; Reuben, Jacobís firstborn, and Simeon, and Levi, and Judah, and Issachar, and Zebulun:  24 The sons of Rachel; Joseph, and Benjamin:  25 And the sons of Bilhah, Rachelís handmaid; Dan, and Naphtali:  26 And the sons of Zilpah, Leahís handmaid; Gad, and Asher: these [are] the sons of Jacob, which were born to him in Padanaram.  27 And Jacob came unto Isaac his father unto Mamre, unto the city of Arbah, which [is] Hebron, where Abraham and Isaac sojourned.  28 And the days of Isaac were an hundred and fourscore years.  29 And Isaac gave up the ghost, and died, and was gathered unto his people, [being] old and full of days: and his sons Esau and Jacob buried him.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline God commands Jacob to go to Beth-el, He puts away idols from his family. (1-5) Jacob builds an altar, Death of Deborah, God blesses Jacob. (6-15) Death of Rachel. (16-20) Reuben|s crime, The death of Isaac. (21-29)

Matthew Henry Commentary:   1-5 Beth-el was forgotten. But as many as God loves, he will remind of neglected duties, one way or other, by conscience or by providences. When we have vowed a vow to God, it is best not to defer the payment of it; yet better late than never. Jacob commanded his household to prepare, not only for the journey and removal, but for religious services. Masters of families should use their authority to keep up religion in their families, Jos 24:15. They must put away strange gods. In families where there is a face of religion, and an altar to God, yet many times there is much amiss, and more strange gods than one would suppose. They must be clean, and change their garments. These were but outward ceremonies, signifying the purifying and change of the heart. What are clean clothes, and new clothes, without a clean heart, and a new heart? If Jacob had called for these idols sooner, they had parted with them sooner. Sometimes attempts for reformation succeed better than we could have thought. Jacob buried their images. We must be wholly separated from our sins, as we are from those that are dead and buried out of sight. He removed from Shechem to Beth-el. Though the Canaanites were very angry against the sons of Jacob for their barbarous usage of the Shechemites, yet they were so kept back by Divine power, that they could not take the opportunity now offered to avenge them. The way of duty is the way of safety. When we are about God|s work, we are under special protection; God is with us, while we are with him; and if He be for us, who can be against us? God governs the world more by secret terrors on men|s minds than we are aware of.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   6-15 The comfort the saints have in holy ordinances, is not so much from Beth-el, the house of God, as from El-beth-el, the God of the house. The ordinances are empty things, if we do not meet with God in them. There Jacob buried Deborah, Rebekah|s nurse. She died much lamented. Old servants in a family, that have in their time been faithful and useful, ought to be respected. God appeared to Jacob. He renewed the covenant with him. I am God Almighty, God all-sufficient, able to make good the promise in due time, and to support thee and provide for thee in the mean time. Two things are promised; that he should be the father of a great nation, and that he should be the master of a good land. These two promises had a spiritual signification, which Jacob had some notion of, though not so clear and distinct as we now have. Christ is the promised Seed, and heaven is the promised land; the former is the foundation, and the latter the top-stone, of all God|s favours.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   16-20 Rachel had passionately said, Give me children, or else I die; and now that she had children, she died! The death of the body is but the departure of the soul to the world of spirits. When shall we learn that it is God alone who really knows what is best for his people, and that in all worldly affairs the safest path for the Christian is to say from the heart, It is the Lord, let him do what seemeth him good. Here alone is our safety and our comfort, to know no will but his. Her dying lips called her newborn son Ben-oni, the son of my sorrow; and many a son proves to be the heaviness of her that bare him. Children are enough the sorrow of their mothers; they should, therefore, when they grow up, study to be their joy, and so, if possible, to make them some amends. But Jacob, because he would not renew the sorrowful remembrance of the mother|s death every time he called his son, changed his name to Benjamin, the son of my right hand: that is, very dear to me; the support of my age, like the staff in my right hand.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   21-29 What a sore affliction Reuben|s sin was, is shown, "and Israel heard it." No more is said, but that is enough. Reuben thought that his father would never hear of it; but those that promise themselves secrecy in sin, are generally disappointed. The age and death of Isaac are recorded, though he died not till after Joseph was sold into Egypt. Isaac lived about forty years after he had made his will, chap. 27:2. We shall not die an hour the sooner, but much the better, for timely setting our hearts and houses in order. Particular notice is taken of the agreement of Esau and Jacob at their father|s funeral, to show how God had wonderfully changed Esau|s mind. It is awful to behold relations, sometimes for a little of this world|s goods, disputing over the graves of their friends, while they are near going to the grave themselves.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 35:1-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 35:3-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Genesis 35:14-999 

  1 And it came to pass, when Jesus had made an end of commanding his twelve disciples, he departed thence to teach and to preach in their cities.  2 Now when John had heard in the prison the works of Christ, he sent two of his disciples,  3 And said unto him, Art thou he that should come, or do we look for another?  4 Jesus answered and said unto them, Go and shew John again those things which ye do hear and see:  5 The blind receive their sight, and the lame walk, the lepers are cleansed, and the deaf hear, the dead are raised up, and the poor have the gospel preached to them.  6 And blessed is [he], whosoever shall not be offended in me.  7 And as they departed, Jesus began to say unto the multitudes concerning John, What went ye out into the wilderness to see? A reed shaken with the wind?  8 But what went ye out for to see? A man clothed in soft raiment? behold, they that wear soft [clothing] are in kingsí houses.  9 But what went ye out for to see? A prophet? yea, I say unto you, and more than a prophet.  10 For this is [he], of whom it is written, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee.  11 Verily I say unto you, Among them that are born of women there hath not risen a greater than John the Baptist: notwithstanding he that is least in the kingdom of heaven is greater than he.  12 And from the days of John the Baptist until now the kingdom of heaven suffereth violence, and the violent take it by force.  13 For all the prophets and the law prophesied until John.  14 And if ye will receive [it], this is Elias, which was for to come.  15 He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.  16 But whereunto shall I liken this generation? It is like unto children sitting in the markets, and calling unto their fellows,  17 And saying, We have piped unto you, and ye have not danced; we have mourned unto you, and ye have not lamented.  18 For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they say, He hath a devil.  19 The Son of man came eating and drinking, and they say, Behold a man gluttonous, and a winebibber, a friend of publicans and sinners. But wisdom is justified of her children.  20 Then began he to upbraid the cities wherein most of his mighty works were done, because they repented not:  21 Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works, which were done in you, had been done in Tyre and Sidon, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.  22 But I say unto you, It shall be more tolerable for Tyre and Sidon at the day of judgment, than for you.  23 And thou, Capernaum, which art exalted unto heaven, shalt be brought down to hell: for if the mighty works, which have been done in thee, had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.  24 But I say unto you, That it shall be more tolerable for the land of Sodom in the day of judgment, than for thee.  25 At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent, and hast revealed them unto babes.  26 Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight.  27 All things are delivered unto me of my Father: and no man knoweth the Son, but the Father; neither knoweth any man the Father, save the Son, and [he] to whomsoever the Son will reveal [him].  28 Come unto me, all [ye] that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.  29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls.  30 For my yoke [is] easy, and my burden is light.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   0-999 Chapter Outline Christ|s preaching. (1) Christ|s answer to John|s disciples. (2-6) Christ|s testimony to John the Baptist. (7-15) The perverseness of the Jews. (16-24) The gospel revealed to the simple. The heavy-laden invited. (25-30) Verse 1 Our Divine Redeemer never was weary of his labour of love; and we should not be weary of well-doing, for in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   2-6 Some think that John sent this inquiry for his own satisfaction. Where there is true faith, yet there may be a mixture of unbelief. The remaining unbelief of good men may sometimes, in an hour of temptation; call in question the most important truths. But we hope that John|s faith did not fail in this matter, and that he only desired to have it strengthened and confirmed. Others think that John sent his disciples to Christ for their satisfaction. Christ points them to what they heard and saw. Christ|s gracious condescensions and compassions to the poor, show that it was he that should bring to the world the tender mercies of our God. Those things which men see and hear, if compared with the Scriptures, direct in what way salvation is to be found. It is difficult to conquer prejudices, and dangerous not to conquer them; but those who believe in Christ, their faith will be found so much the more to praise, and honour, and glory.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   7-15 What Christ said concerning John, was not only for his praise, but for the people|s profit. Those who attend on the word will be called to give an account of their improvements. Do we think when the sermon is done, the care is over? No, then the greatest of the care begins. John was a self-denying man, dead to all the pomps of the world and the pleasures of sense. It becomes people, in all their appearances, to be consistent with their character and their situation. John was a great and good man, yet not perfect; therefore he came short of glorified saints. The least in heaven knows more, loves more, and does more in praising God, and receives more from him, than the greatest in this world. But by the kingdom of heaven here, is rather to be understood the kingdom of grace, the gospel dispensation in its power and purity. What reason we have to be thankful that our lot is cast in the days of the kingdom of heaven, under such advantages of light and love! Multitudes were wrought upon by the ministry of John, and became his disciples. And those strove for a place in this kingdom, that one would think had no right nor title to it, and so seemed to be intruders. It shows us what fervency and zeal are required of all. Self must be denied; the bent, the frame and temper of the mind must be altered. Those who will have an interest in the great salvation, will have it upon any terms, and not think them hard, nor quit their hold without a blessing. The things of God are of great and common concern. God requires no more from us than the right use of the faculties he has given us. People are ignorant, because they will not learn.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   16-24 Christ reflects on the scribes and Pharisees, who had a proud conceit of themselves. He likens their behaviour to children|s play, who being out of temper without reason, quarrel with all the attempts of their fellows to please them, or to get them to join in the plays for which they used to assemble. The cavils of worldly men are often very trifling and show great malice. Something they have to urge against every one, however excellent and holy. Christ, who was undefiled, and separate from sinners, is here represented as in league with them, and polluted by them. The most unspotted innocence will not always be a defence against reproach. Christ knew that the hearts of the Jews were more bitter and hardened against his miracles and doctrines, than those of Tyre and Sidon would have been; therefore their condemnation would be the greater. The Lord exercises his almighty power, yet he punishes none more than they deserve, and never withholds the knowledge of the truth from those who long after it.

Matthew Henry Commentary:   25-30 It becomes children to be grateful. When we come to God as a Father, we must remember that he is Lord of heaven and earth, which obliges us to come to him with reverence as to the sovereign Lord of all; yet with confidence, as one able to defend us from evil, and to supply us with all good. Our blessed Lord added a remarkable declaration, that the Father had delivered into his hands all power, authority, and judgment. We are indebted to Christ for all the revelation we have of God the Father|s will and love, ever since Adam sinned. Our Saviour has invited all that labour and are heavy-laden, to come unto him. In some senses all men are so. Worldly men burden themselves with fruitless cares for wealth and honours; the gay and the sensual labour in pursuit of pleasures; the slave of Satan and his own lusts, is the merest drudge on earth. Those who labour to establish their own righteousness also labour in vain. The convinced sinner is heavy-laden with guilt and terror; and the tempted and afflicted believer has labours and burdens. Christ invites all to come to him for rest to their souls. He alone gives this invitation; men come to him, when, feeling their guilt and misery, and believing his love and power to help, they seek him in fervent prayer. Thus it is the duty and interest of weary and heavy-laden sinners, to come to Jesus Christ. This is the gospel call; Whoever will, let him come. All who thus come will receive rest as Christ|s gift, and obtain peace and comfort in their hearts. But in coming to him they must take his yoke, and submit to his authority. They must learn of him all things, as to their comfort and obedience. He accepts the willing servant, however imperfect the services. Here we may find rest for our souls, and here only. Nor need we fear his yoke. His commandments are holy, just, and good. It requires self-denial, and exposes to difficulties, but this is abundantly repaid, even in this world, by inward peace and joy. It is a yoke that is lined with love. So powerful are the assistances he gives us, so suitable the encouragements, and so strong the consolations to be found in the way of duty, that we may truly say, it is a yoke of pleasantness. The way of duty is the way of rest. The truths Christ teaches are such as we may venture our souls upon. Such is the Redeemer|s mercy; and why should the labouring and burdened sinner seek for rest from any other quarter? Let us come to him daily, for deliverance from wrath and guilt, from sin and Satan, from all our cares, fears, and sorrows. But forced obedience, far from being easy and light, is a heavy burden. In vain do we draw near to Jesus with our lips, while the heart is far from him. Then come to Jesus to find rest for your souls.

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Matthew 11:1-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Matthew 11:7-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Matthew 11:20-999 

A Commentary By J Vernon MCgee For Matthew 11:28-999